Steve Jobs Tribute – A Mark on Design, Too.

Steve Jobs – A universally recognized face. image from Maypalo.com

It ‘s hard to live in most cultures today and not be affected or influenced by something that would not have been a reality,  had Steve Jobs had not passed this way. His death seems nearly surreal. We tend to picture what is larger than life being just that; his loss is a  poignant reminder of the universal inevitability shared by all who pass this way. But it’s also a tribute to what can be achieved with the time at hand, if one is truly inspired and driven by personal vision so compelling, that it seems impossible to act in any other capacity.

I did not know Steve Jobs, or anyone who knew him, and this is not a tech blog – but like so many niches of interest, he had a hand in making the tools for the trade that I love just a bit more handy and accessible. I thought a brief aside might be in order to share some great design apps today as a gesture of respect from one person to another who holds vision and inspiration in the highest regard.

Icovia Planner is the best thing since…..well, I would have to consider….

a screen shot using icovia room planner

Icovia is a very user friendly space planner that provides all manner of room attributes from sofas to recessed lighting fixtures, and allows anyone to design a room like a pro. You begin by creating a ceiling elevation of your room, so that all the walls, windows and doors are the empty foot print of your room. All room elements can be re-sized, to represent your actual or potential furnishings, so that the correct scale, flow through, and layout are just clicks away, before you role op your sleeves, or swipe your VISA.

Steve Jobs have -0- to do with creating the Icovia Room Planner, but the iPhone made it possible for you to take this invaluable pocket designer into the furniture or lighting showroom with you, reducing by about 70% of the potential for design remorse:

http://www.ifreeware.net/download-icovia-edition.html

If you have read any of my articles on personalizing Pantone Color Trends, then you know that I suggest beginning with a first impression of the image that the palette you respond to is conveying to you – like a Japanese Garden, for example. Courtesy of Steve Jobs, the iPhone allows you to take Benjamin Moore or Sherwin Williams (to name a couple) on that inspirational stroll as a pocket translator of color.

A screen capture from Sherwin William’s color app – image from fixr.com

The best way to hang a picture wall is by using a template or laying your pictures out on butcher paper and creating by tracing your pictures and pinning or taping your template to the wall of choice. No, I doubt Steve Jobs ever whiled away an hour doing this, but he made it easy to get it right.

ihandy level app – image from itunes apple app store

Never hang it crooked again: http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/ihandy-level-free/id299852753?mt=8

The iHandy has to be calibrated on a flat surface in portrait before use – the best way to do this, is on top of a level on a flat surface – then touch the cross-hairs feature button, rotate the phone to landscape, and repeat.

I.D Wood allows you (and your iPhone) to be the floor designer. This virtual wood guide samples specimens of wood flooring from around the world. It offers detailed product spec with images of almost 200 types of wood flooring from the basic to exotic species. Detailed information includes, species names, descriptions, origins, durability, woodworking properties and more.

Use version 2.2 – the bugs have been fixed:  http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/i.d.-wood/id325838725?mt=8

id wood app screen shot – image from the apple store

There are more design apps out there, and the list grows weekly, but some more technical, more trade specific.

Mozart will not be remembered for painting or pastry, nor will Steve Jobs be remembered for Interior Design apps. What he will be remembered for is paving the bumpy road of information accessibility, so that it is accessible to all. I would wish him peace in the next leg of his journey, but from what little I know of him, that’s the last thing he would want.

Thank you, Mr. Jobs. A great many of us enjoyed and benefited from your all too brief stay here.